Assisted Living Communities and Hospice Care

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Many assisted living communities embrace an “aging in place” philosophy meaning that residents receive increasing levels of care without having to leave the community. This allows residents to stay in their community for as long as they choose – from assisted living to end-of-life hospice care – which removes a lot of the uncertainty from the long-term care planning.

To accommodate residents through end-of-life, many assisted living communities allow hospice care providers to visit residents who are terminally ill. Hospice care, which is covered by Medicare and most private health insurance plans, provides what’s known as comfort care in a team approach — care that eases pain, alleviates discomfort, provides psychological support and spiritual support  when a patient’s illness is no longer responding to treatment.

Hospice teams do much more than provide medications such as painkillers and sedatives. They educate the patient’s primary caregiver as well as provide emotional and spiritual support and counseling to the patient and the patient’s loved ones. The goal is to allow the patient to have a comfortable and dignified exit from this life.

Hospice Care

A common misconception about hospice is that it’s somewhere patients go. While there are some hospice facilities, they are fairly rare. Hospice teams visit patients in their own homes, wherever that happens to be. For assisted living residents, of course, the community is their home.

A growing number of assisted living communities are able to accommodate residents who need hospice care during their time at the community. No assisted living community can guarantee that they will be able to accommodate a resident until their last days. Certain scenarios may require that a terminally ill resident be moved to a nursing home or hospital. But if the resident doesn’t need the kind of care or attention that’s provided at a hospital or nursing home, he or she can very often remain at the senior community with the aid of the hospice team.

Your hospice team will work hard for the resident who is receiving hospice care, work hard for the community to ensure the community understands the specific needs of the resident receiving hospice services. Some of the items that will be addressed by the hospice team are:

  • Medication orders
  • Treatment orders
  • Diet orders
  • Wound Management
  • Medical Equipment Needs
  • ADL assistance
  • Counseling Support
  • Spiritual Support
  • Dignity
  • Privacy
  • Honoring Residents Wishes
  • Following or Developing Advance Directives for Residents
  • Monthly Care Coordination Meetings with the Assisted Living

 

All hospice care is customized care and tailored to the needs of the resident in need of hospice services. The hospice team will work together with the staff of the assisted living to coordinate a plan of care that works best for the resident.

For more information about Front Range Hospice and Palliative Care please call (303)957-3101 or (970)776-8080 or email us at info@frhospice.com

“When medicine cannot provide a cure, hospice can offer assistance; care and comfort that can help maintain a better quality of life for the patient.”

 

 

About Front Range Hospice- Legendary Care

Front Range Hospice is a center for excellence in providing end-of-life care and we continue to strive to keep our company achieving distinction. Visit us at www.frhospice.com.
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